Sell Yourself
You want to attract winners. People who care about winning and who show up, get it quick and deliver results fast and on an ongoing basis.
Konstantin Postumitenko

Sell Yourself

A sales strategy isn’t just for drumming up new business anymore. Business consultant Jim Canfield outlines two essential factors that’ll position your company to attract top-flight talent

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EDITOR'S NOTE: For more of Jim Canfields' business tips and insight, catch his episode of The Snow Magazine Podcast. CLICK HERE to listen.


The recent Covid-19 pandemic has placed a lot of people out of work. And as the country pushes forward with reopening the economy, many of those furloughed individuals are beginning to learn that they have no jobs to come back to.

This unfortunate scenario creates a unique scenario for small business owners because the labor pool will suddenly be filled with really solid, talented people looking for jobs, says Jim Canfield, President of  CEO Tools, which provides strategies and business performance tools that empower business owners to drive profitable growth.

 

“You want to attract people from that group who are winners,” says Canfield, a featured educator at this year’s Executive Summit. “People who care about winning and who show up, get it quick and deliver results fast and on an ongoing basis.”

So, how do you attract the top talent to your organization? It stars with honing your employer brand, Canfield says. “What’s the story your employees are telling about working for you to other people who might be available?” he says. “This is going to be mission critical.

The problem is most employers are used to a passive approach to hiring, Canfield says. That’s where you place a “Help Wanted” ad and then select the individual who best suits your needs from a large group of candidates that magically materializes.

“Now, it’s more of a sales job,” he says. “We need to sell our company on why the very best people who are available should come work with and for us and not for someone else.

“In the same way we develop an elevator pitch and a value proposition talk for the sales part of our business, now we need to do that same work inside of recruiting,” Canfield adds.

Applied to recruiting top talent, the elevator pitch piques the candidate’s interest in your company while the brand proposition emphasizes your values and culture and seals the deal.

“You must be able to articulate these for a candidate so they get excited about coming to work for your organization and not for somebody else,” Canfield says.

Mike Zawacki is the editor of Snow Magazine.